product_data

De Chirico's Threads

Carol Rumens
ISBN-13: 
9781854115348
Publication Date: 
Monday, June 14, 2010
0
No votes yet
£8.99

 

De Chirico’s Threads, the new collection of poems from Carol Rumens features an unusual centre-piece, a verse-play, fizzing with ideas and surrealist imagery, based on the  life and work of the Italian painter Georges De Chirico, as well as forty pages of distinctive and beautifully crafted individual poems by one of the UK’s best poets. An acute socio-political awareness, sometimes satirical, sometimes tender, inspires a number of pieces such as the distopian vision of ‘2084’, while ‘The Tadpole goddess’, is a clever alternative nature poem. 

Her delight in form is displayed in the series ‘Six Sonnets on Petrarchan Themes’. Also here are poems about various places in London, such as the Crystal Palace rail station and ‘East Ending’ which celebrates an old music hall. Sophisticated, playful, relevant and humane, a new collection by Carol Rumens is not to be missed.

User Reviews

Anonymous's picture

Review from Planet

0
No votes yet

A new collection from Carol Rumens - and this is her fifteenth - is always something to look forward to in the certain knowledge that we are going to encounter that is rich in association and satisfying in it's craftsmanship. De Chirico's Threads does not disappoint.

Nicholas Murray, Planet Feb Issue

18/03/2011 - 09:02
Anonymous's picture

Review from Poetry Wales

0
No votes yet

She has a formidable reputation as a journalist, translator, novelist, playwright and professor. The collection is in three parts and takes its title from verse play whose concerns spill into preceding poems. At its core is the question of how an artist keeps going. Of course what a verse play allows Rumens to do is make the debate live. It's a mechanism for allowing the different threads of an argument to co-exist, for fellow artists that include a loser and plagiarist and society personified by newspaper editor and columnist, Change-it and Chance-it. The collection is demanding but so skilfully constructed that it manages to refer inward to the artist's role and look outwards with versatile explorations of language, form and meaning. Rumens' weekly poetry blog for The Guardian assiduously promotes poets she believes are neglected and shows the infinite variety of work in the world. this collection is in the same generous spirit - it puts the writer's experience at the centre and in that respect is further poof of her erudition and engagement. Jackie Wills, Poetry Wales Winter 2010/11

26/01/2011 - 15:37
Anonymous's picture

Review from Ambit

0
No votes yet

This is Carol Rumens's fourteenth collection, following the much-praised 'Blind Spots'. In three parts, the first is 'Ice and Fire: Sonnets for Late Elizabethan Lovers", which shows the sonnet, in skilful hands, is still a very lively and variable form. 'De Chirico Paints Ariadne on Naxos', which quotes from a 'fragment of poetry of poetry by Giorgio De Chirico', presages Part Three, a verse-drama 'with Soundscape', which occupies about half the collection. I don't feel competent enough to describe or comment upon this part, except to say that it has all of her verse and wit. Part Two, 'Itinerary Through a Photograph Album', brings out Rumens of her previous collections, which has her joyfulness and wide-ranging subject matter. She could, I feel, write a poem on the head of a pin; about a pin, or even with a pin. I think a 'Collected' is due... Barry Cole, Ambit 203

26/01/2011 - 12:14
Anonymous's picture

Review from The Warwick Review

0
No votes yet

The painter Giorgio de Chirico, is a running theme throughout Carol Rumens’ De Chirico’s Threads. Rumens splits her book into “Ice and Fire: Sonnets for Late-Elizabethen Lovers”, “Itinerary Through A Photograph Album” and then finally the titular segment on de Chirico, which she describes as “a verse drama, with soundscape.” The opening sequence of Petrarchan sonnets, including the one called ‘De Chirico Paints Ariadne on Naxos,’ intermingles erudition and formal dexterity with distinctly modern references. The following lines are from ‘The Soldier’s Girl-friend’: I google LOVE POEMS, savour crushed desire: Our courtship, whose whole concept’s mediaeval, Shivers between Petrarch’s ice and fire. There is also a broad range of emotion. In one poem a gothic monster humorously engages with technology in ‘Count Dracula Creates His Online Profile.’ That is followed by the somber reflections of ‘Hurbinek’s Children’, which draws on Primo Levi’s description of a three-year old Auschwitz survivor, who died soon after winning his freedom. The verse-drama takes up half the book, discussing the concept of originality and art. De Chirco is beset on all sides by critics and lesser painters whose concern for fashion and profit greatly outweighs their commitment to art. Prose mingles with rhyming iambic pentameter and canzone, among other forms, peopled by historical figures like Apollinaire, André Breton and Carlo Carra. The last of these three is treated in the verse-drama as a plagiarist, no better than the criminals who flooded the market with de Chirico forgeries in the 1940’s and 1950’s. As the verse-drama draws to a close, de Chirico is struggling to escape his previous style, the demands of his audience seeking to draw him back to an earlier, more popular idiom. It is a suitable backdrop against which Rumens can give full rein to her thorough understanding of form, history, and philosophical arguments on the nature of creativity.

Can Sönmez , Warwick Review, Sept 2010

25/10/2010 - 19:26