Kim Moore wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize

5 December 2017 - 10:06am

Kim Moore wins Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize

5 December 2017 - 10:06am

Kim Moore has scooped up the prestigious Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize for her debut collection of poetry, The Art of Falling.

The Art of Falling covers everything from Moore’s experiences as a trumpet teacher to her father’s profession as a scaffolder, as well as the suffragettes and a tattoo inspired by Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. In ‘My People’, she writes of how some “swear without knowing they are swearing … scaffolders and plasterers and shoemakers and carers, the type of carers paid pence per minute to visit an old lady’s house”. The quietly devastating central sequence, ‘How I Abandoned My Body To His Keeping’, is the story of a woman embroiled in a relationship marked by coercion and violence. These are close-to-the-bone pieces, harrowing and exact, inspired by personal experience.

The judges, poets Gillian Clarke and Katharine Towers, and the New Statesman’s Tom Gatti, said that Moore’s poems “accrue force and vigour as they speak to each other across the pages, delivering a thrilling encounter with language at its most irresistible and essential”.

The Geoffrey Faber prize, which is worth £1,500, is given in alternate years to a volume of verse and a volume of prose fiction “of the greatest literary merit”. It has been won in the past by Seamus Heaney, Tony Harrison, JM Coetzee and Eimear McBride.