New Relations: Refashioning of British Poetry 1980-94

New Realtions
David Kennedy
This ground-breaking study offers an expert commentary on the many and wide-spread changes which have affected British poetry since the 80s. From the changing personnel to a new publishing landscape; from youth culture audiences to new subjects and readings, hardly any aspect of poetry remains untouched. David Kennedy, co-editor of The New Poetry, considers many poets critically for the first time, including Armitage, Maxwell, Reading, Bush, Duffy and Boland. Larkin, Heaney, Dunn and Harrison are among the more established poets he discusses. Thematically, New Relations includes a Rough Guide to British Postmodernism, and essays on Poetry and Science, Poetry as Media, and the new marketing ploys. Truly contemporary, wide-ranging, fascinating in its readings New Relations is an essential text for poets and readers.
£9.95

New Relations: Refashioning of British Poetry 1980-94

new relations, david kennedy
David Kennedy
This ground-breaking study offers an expert commentary on the many and wide-spread changes which have affected British poetry in the last fifteen years. From the changing personnel to a new publishing landscape; from youth culture audiences to new subjects and readings, hardly any aspect of poetry remains untouched.David Kennedy, co-editor of The New Poetry, considers many poets critically for the first time, including Armitage, Maxwell, Reading, Bush, Duffy and Boland. Larkin, Heaney, Dunn and Harrison are among the more established poets he discusses.Thematically, New Relations includes a Rough Guide to British Postmodernism, and essays on Poetry and Science, Poetry as Media, and the new marketing ploys. Truly contemporary, wide-ranging, fascinating in its readings New Relations is an essential text for poets and readers.
£19.95

How Novelists Work

Maura Dooley
Following the success of How Poets Work comes this guide for would-be and published novelists. Ten contributors share their experiences of how to write a novel, where to begin, how to develop plot, character, structure, imagery, and - importantly - where to end.Literary novels, thrillers, cowboy stories, post-modem confections are all discussed, together with the difficulties of getting - and staying - published. The relationship between writer and publisher looms almost as large as that between writer and reader.In addition to advice and tips these often humorous essays also point to the diverse and idiosyncratic world of the novelist, who may write only in hotels, only in a particular room at home, only in longhand, only on a computer, only with a carefully devised plan, only with a character and no idea for a plot.
£6.95

Dylan Remembered, Volume One: 1914-1934

Dylan Remembered, Volume One: 1914-1934
David N. Thomas
This is the first of two volumes of transcribed interviews about the poet Dylan Thomas. Journalist, broadcaster, and author Colin Edwards interviewed numerous sources close to Thomas for a planned biography of the poet, but he was unable to begin work before his early death. The transcribed tapes have been edited into two collections, with the second due in 2004. Startling new information about Thomas’s life and writing is disclosed, including influences on his writing and the sources from which he drew inspiration and storylines.
£12.95

Critical Writings on R.S. Thomas

Sandra Anstey
R.S. Thomas is Wales’ most famous living writer. His uncompromising stance on issues concerning Welsh nationalism, as well as his eloquent verse have, over the forty-six years of his career, earned him international acclaim and a vital place in the hearts and minds of his compatriots. This revised and expanded second edition of Critical Writings on R.S. Thomas includes seven essays from the original 1982 volume as well as a selection of seven new essays. These varied and illuminating texts outline aspects of R.S. Thomas’s writing career from his first volume, The Stones of the Field, in 1946 to his latest collection, Counterpoint in 1990. Also included is an extensive updated bibliography of the critical material on R.S. Thomas. This volume offers a lively and valuable assessment of R.S. Thomas’s literary achievement to date.
£12.95

Ancestral Lines

Ancestral Lines, Linden Peach
Linden Peach
Ancestral Lines explores poetry written away from the economic and cultural centre by six poets: Seamus Heaney, Tony Harrison, Douglas Dunn, Gillian Clarke, Sally Roberts Jones and Oliver Reynolds. Linden Peach sees them all as responsible for mapping locales: their work, he claims, is a voyage of geographical discovery for the literary world and a struggle with language to articulate in poetry their people’s lives. In the process they refute the notion of poetry as the preserve of the English middle-classes.Studies of the individual poets are accompanied by more wide-ranging essays on the influence of politics, history and myth on poetry from Ireland, Wales and the North of England, describing how poetry emerges from the complex matrix of personal, regional, national and historical identities. This book is a welcome challenge to conventional literary notions of life on the margins.
£14.95

A Straitened Stage: Saunders Lewis' Theatre

A Straitened Stage: Saunders Lewis' Theatre
Ioan Williams
Saunders Lewis (1893-1985), poet, novelist, lecturer, founder of Plaid Cymru (the Welsh Nationalist Party) was also the greatest Welsh language playwright of the century. His nineteen plays are a peculiarly Welsh response to the crisis in European theatre of the 1890s, and make a distinctive contribution to mainstream European culture.In this authoritative study, loan Williams describes Lewis’s important place in a line of dramatists stretching from Racine, Ibsen, Synge, Yeats, Claudel and Eliot, through Beckett, Brecht and Pirandello, to lonescu, Arden, Osbome and Pinter, and suggests a new direction for English theatre based on Lewis’s work.Lewis’s theatre was essentially Naturalist, his ´straitened stage´ narrow and clearly defined. Yet like Brecht and Pirandello he recognised the fragility of human experience and its inability to organise the world to achieve individual definition. As a Catholic convert, however, Lewis recognised a spiritual dimension to the human character which enabled his creations to confront their profound fears and free themselves oj the restraints of materialism and society.Drawing on the Bible, Welsh legend, the Dark Ages, the Cold War, Lewis’s plays, with their central strand of irony, force their audience to re-examine themselves and society. The theatre of Saunders Lewis is often poetic and always provocative.
£12.95

A Ride Through The Wood: Essays on Anglo-Welsh Literature

Roland Mathias
In collecting these essays Roland Mathias uses for his subjects the symbol of a wood, virtually unexplored, and until recently considered to be on the edge of a map of English literature. Mathias, as he puts it, is in ´possession of a different map, one on which the wood appears much closer to the centre´, and ´A Ride Through the Wood´ is an unusual selection of essays on Anglo-Welsh writers by a critic who shares their particular background and is knowledgeable about it.
£12.95

Richard Hughes: Novelist

Richard Poole
Richard Hughes (1900-76) is probably best known for his remarkable bestseller about childhood, A High Wind in Jamaica (1929), now recognised as a modern classic. In Hazard (1938), his second novel, has been compared to Conrad’s Typhoon. In his latter years, he worked on a series of novels, called The Human Predicament, a massive project in which he explored the social, economic, political and moral forces which shaped the period 1918-1945. Although only two of these novels, The Fox in the Attic (1961) and The Wooden Sheperdess (1973), were completed, Hughes’s achievement has been widely praised. No other twentieth century novelist has so successfully transposed history into fiction.Richard Poole, who lived near Hughes in north Wales and who came to know and admire him, has written the first biographical and critical study of this major author. The first part of this book reveals more than ever before the extrordinary life of this remarkable man, who was a successful playwright before he left Oxford University, who wrote the first radio play, who undertook amazing adventures in the Balkans and Morocco, and who, for nearly the whole of his life, exhibited a deep attachment to Wales.The second and longer part of the book is a detailed examination of Hughes’s work: his plays, poems, short stories and the novels. This is a study enriched by Poole’s intimate knowledge of the man and his sources. Hughes emerges as a writer of staggering versatility, fastidious craftmanship and deep humanity.
£12.95